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The Echo

The Student News Site of Tenafly High School

The Echo

The Student News Site of Tenafly High School

The Echo

Why You Should Stop Procrastinating

Why+You+Should+Stop+Procrastinating

As a high school student, it’s almost a given that you have procrastinated before. After a long day at school, it’s hard to resist enjoying the many sweet distractions on the internet. I myself used to be a chronic procrastinator who pushed off all work until it was at least 8 p.m., and this eventually caused detriments to my health and my academic performances. Here are some consequences of procrastination that I would like to share with you. 

Poor Sleep Quality

When we procrastinate, we often have to stay up late to finish our assignments or study for an exam. While it may seem normal for teenagers to sleep late, it’s important for us to understand the detriments of sleep deprivation. According to Cogent Psychology, chronic procrastinators suffer from “poor sleep quality, including feeling bad after waking up, having more difficulty staying awake during the day, sleeping less hours at night, and needing medication to help them sleep.” With the lack of good sleep, it also becomes difficult for students to concentrate in class and think intuitively. As stated by Sleep Foundation, sleep deprivation can lower people’s learning abilities “by as much as 40%,” which leads right into my next argument. 

Low Academic Performance

Some students may even think that procrastinating may actually lead to better grades because you cram the information in your head the day before the exam. But if you think processing everything right before the test is helpful, you’re wrong. With the lack of sleep resulting from procrastination, our grades are more likely to decrease than increase. According to Rise Science, “processing speed to short term memory are all negatively affected by sleep deprivation,” one of the major consequences of procrastination. Moreover, solvingprocrastination.com states that procrastination is associated with academic issues such as “lower quality work, worse exam scores, worse grades, increased academic misconduct and dishonesty, increased course failures, increased course withdrawals, and an increased likelihood of dropping out.” I can attest to this fact, as I recall seeing a significant drop in my grades for the few months of sophomore year when I procrastinated. 

Increased Stress and Anxiety

With a lack of good sleep and decreasing grades, procrastination may also heighten mental difficulties. According to McLean Hospital, procrastinators develop high levels of anxiety from delaying their work, which can lead to “negative functioning and risks to mental health.” When you’re finishing your work last minute before the due date, you are forced under pressure to create a perfect result in a short amount of time. This makes you feel guilty for pushing off the work, worried about your grades, and short-term panic. The stress you suffer through only increases when you get your grades back and see that you didn’t do well, which only makes you want to avoid doing your work and procrastinate. 

While procrastinating may seem attractive in the face of the many fun distractions we have on the internet, it is important to recognize the repercussions in our mental health as well as our grades. So, the next time you get home, try to put your phone down and start your work. Try organizing your time by using a planner every day. These attempts may seem hard and troublesome at first, but with continued efforts to manage your time, you will soon find a healthier student inside you.

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About the Contributor
Heeseo Yoon, Junior Editor
Heeseo Yoon ('25), Echo's Junior Editor, enjoys writing about world affairs and creating cartoons.